Project Blue Book Special Report #13 ??????

Project Blue Book Special Report No
After Project Blue Book ceased operation its files were moved to Maxwell Air Force Base, which is located in the middle of Alabama. The files were made available to the public as microfilm, as was common with many official records at the time. Most are now available on the Internet as well. In addition to the files of Project Blue Book cases, there was a paper released to the public in 1955 known as Project Blue Book Special Report 14. It contains an analysis of the reports collected up until that time. It states in its summary “it is considered to be highly improbable that reports of unidentified aerial objects examined in this study represent observations of technological developments outside the range of present day scientific knowledge.” This statement has attracted a great deal of attention because it implies there is little merit to extraordinary claims about UFOs. However, many people maintain that the data contained in the report itself contradicts this conclusion!
Project Blue Book Special Report No. 14. - UFO Casebook
Project Blue Book Special Report No. 14 was their massive statistical analysis of Blue Book cases to date, some 3200 by the time the report was completed in 1954, after Ruppelt had left Blue Book. Even today, it represents the largest such study ever undertaken. Battelle employed four scientific analysts, who sought to divide cases into "knowns", "unknowns", and a third category of "insufficient information." They also broke down knowns and unknowns into four categories of quality, from excellent to poor. E.g., cases deemed excellent might typically involve experienced witnesses such as airline pilots or trained military personnel, multiple witnesses, corroborating evidence such as radar contact or photographs, etc. In order for a case to be deemed a "known", only two analysts had to independently agree on a solution. However, for a case to be called an "unknown", all four analysts had to agree. Thus the criterion for an "unknown" was quite stringent. and BLUEBOOK REPORTS 1-12 Published by THE ..Project Blue Book Report No, 14of unsolved Project Blue Book reports - Altered Dimensions Paranormal
Astronomer Dr. Allen J. Hynek was a scientific adviser to Projects Sign, Grudge and Blue Book. Early on it would appear that he was interested in the phenomena but not convinced that there was any great mystery. In fact, Project Blue Book Special Report 14 quoted Dr. Hynek’s definition of a flying saucer or disc as something that “remains unexplained to the viewer at least long enough for him to write a report about it.” Over the years, however, examination of the many sightings reported to the Air Force led Dr. Hynek to change his mind and accept the theory that something, very possibly extraterrestrial or even transdimensional, was being seen by witnesses across the country. By the late 1960s he was fairly open in his criticism of Project Blue Book’s practices. After the Air Force investigation closed he established The Center for UFO Studies in an attempt to make a fair study of the UFO phenomena. Some found Hynek’s apparent conversion to be disingenuous because of his close association with the US Air Force studies for over two decades. It has even been suggested that his true purpose was to act as a disinformation agent. Despite these theories, Dr. Hynek was a well known proponent of the scientific study of unidentified flying objects until his death in 1986. He even acted as an adviser to the film Close Encounters of the Third Kind.Project Blue Book Special Report No. 14 was their massive statistical analysis of Blue Book cases to date, some 3200 by the time the report was completed in 1954, after Ruppelt had left Blue Book. Even today, it represents the largest such study ever undertaken.There was a final report, #14 which was widely circulated and about which an entire book was written: FLYING SAUCERS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE AIR FORCE PROJECT BLUE BOOK SPECIAL REPORT NO. 14 by Leon Davidson: the fifth edition was published in 1976 by Blue-Book Publishers; 64 Prospect St., White Plains, New York 10606. Missing from public view, however, was report #13.March 23, 1952; Yakima, Washington. 6:56 and 7 p.m. Witnesses: pilot and radar operator of F-94 jet interceptor. On either occasion, a red fireball increased in brightness and then faded over 45 second span. Stationary both times. Note: Project Blue Book Status Report #7 (May 31, 1952) says target was also tracked by ground radar at 78 knots (90 m.p.h.) at 22,500′ and 25,000′ altitude.